Commitment Officer

From Human Resource Manager to Chief Commitment Officer

In our work, we often hear HR executives lament about not having a seat at the table when it comes to being part of the strategic decision-making process. They frequently speak of the desire to be true strategic partners with their peers, rather than merely comp and benefits administrators or purveyors of training programs that may or may not contribute to the bottom line of the business.

The good news is that the time has never been better for HR execs to reconstitute their role — by shifting from Human Resource Managers to Chief Commitment Officers. What CEOs and business leaders want and need more than ever is employees who are 100% engaged and committed to the success of the organization, and no one is better positioned and equipped to support this need than HR.

But to do this, rather than say yes to every request for training they receive, HR instead needs to identify the key opportunities for driving increased engagement and commitment — and focus laser-like on dissolving the fear, apathy, cynicism, resistance and resignation that permeate most organizations.

Much of what HR has historically provided that does not make the greatest contribution to the success of the business can be either outsourced, if appropriate, or at least made routine and automated.

HR managers today are uniquely positioned to a) identify areas of misalignment and friction, and b) help business leaders transform those dynamics into total alignment and shared commitment. The results of partnering with business leaders in this fashion will be exactly what HR leaders have longed for all along.

Founder and President of Quantum Performance Inc., a management consulting firm specializing in generating total alignment and engagement in organizations.

His work has encompassed a broad range of industries including banking, telecommunications, manufacturing, entertainment, real estate, retail, startups and non-profits.

8 replies
    • josh
      josh says:

      LH – Every modern organization has some form of distribution curve for performance, and many are or have dealt with reductions in force. We’ve partnered with plenty of HR professionals who were convinced morale and layoffs are – without exception – inversely correlated. This is not necessarily true – it is possible to get people oriented around a bright, plausible future for the organization that may require a smaller workforce. Tricky, but not impossible. If you’d like to chat about this, email me at jleibner@quantumperformanceinc.com.

      Reply
  1. benkingery
    benkingery says:

    Agreed. The role of the HR manager must parallel the needs of his or her changing organization. Successful organizations are becoming more adaptive, resilient, quick to change direction and customer-centered.

    Reply
  2. Billie Moss
    Billie Moss says:

    With these statements, you’re saying that the HR professional, who is considered necessary by line managers, is a strategic partner, an employee sponsor or advocate and a change mentor? …

    Reply
    • josh
      josh says:

      Billie – Yes, an HR manager needs to play all of these roles at different times. He/she can not ignore the comp & benefits administration that must be done, but must also stand in the shoes of his/her business partners and find ways to address their business challenges.

      Reply
  3. Josh Leibner
    Josh Leibner says:

    Yes, follow the thread – also, chapter 9 of our book is all about Human Resource Officers becoming Chief Commitment Officers – you can learn more there.

    Reply

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